Google Adsense will begin featuring publishers owned by underrepresented groups

 

Google Adsense has announced in an email that they will being to feature publishers owned by underrepresented groups as a way to fight inherent, systemic racism and bias as part of Google’s commitments to racial equity.

How it all started

This all started in 2020 when one of our buyers, Display & Video 360, began highlighting self-identified Black-owned publishers within Marketplace,  This program has allowed interested advertisers to thoughtfully design campaigns that support underrepresented businesses.

Now Display & Video 360 has expanded this program to both Women-owned and Latino-owned publishers. Display & Video 360’s program is one element of a broader initiative across Google to make our products more inclusive and make it easier for customers to find and support underrepresented businesses. This program remains a pilot and we hope to expand to more underrepresented groups in future – watch this space.

Program eligibility requirements

• Publisher must have their own Google AdSense or Ad Manager account
• Publisher’s AdSense account must have the billing address located in the United States; for Ad Manager, the network must have country set at ‘United States’
• The Google entity that signed the self-identified AdSense or Ad Manager contract must be Google LLC
• Publisher’s organization must be majority owned and controlled by members of the group they are self-identifying as (Black, Women, or Latino)

Google notes that the program will highlight businesses owned by underrepresented groups, but not content aimed at these specific groups. Display & Video 360 does not allow advertisers to target ads based on categories such as race, religion, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.

To participate in the program

If your a business that’s part of the one of these underrepresented categories, meet the criteria above and would like to be included in this beta program, please submit your information on Google’s Marketplace Diversity & Inclusion form.

When accepted, Google will be periodically add new publishers who apply. This is a voluntary program; if you do not wish to participate, no action is required.

 

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How to measure personal growth, self-improvement without sabotaging your confidence

Working on self-improvement and bettering your lifestyle is a great way to improve your physical and mental health. However, without taking into account your needs and limits, it can turn into a long and difficult battle against yourself. To avoid increasing your risk of mental health conditions like anxiety, depression, and stress, it’s important to break down and fully understand your self-improvement journey.

Understanding self-Improvement without creating an obsession

Taking on a self-improvement project simply to be a better version of yourself is all the reasoning you may need to fully commit to the experience. However, it’s crucial to develop a personal growth plan with realistic goals and measurements to truly bloom into a better person. Ask yourself why you’ve decided to do this, how you’d like to benefit from the experience, and what opportunities you’d like to take advantage of as you progress.

Obsessing over your self-image and rushing through programs won’t transform you into a happier, healthier, brighter person. Instead, it can have the opposite effect; if you’ve set expectations too high, it can be a hard hit to your mentality and motivation. Pacing yourself and developing a checks and balances system that prioritizes your health is crucial for successfully measuring and seeing advancements in personal growth.

Set Reasonable Goals and Expectations

While you don’t need to break down your goals into minute-by-minute bite-sized pieces, breaking up your overall objectives can make success feel more obtainable. Start by acknowledging what you want out of this strategy; why do you want to accomplish this particular end goal? What kind of changes are you hoping to see? Outlining these answers can provide you with motivation throughout the process, giving you concrete reasons to work toward.

These questions can also help you think of alternative routes to get to the end goal. By coming up with secondary plans, you’re less likely to be hard on yourself for missed opportunities or taking breaks. For example, if you want to lose a certain amount of weight, don’t just focus on hitting the gym for X amount of days a week. Instead, also consider what you’re eating, how you can edit your schedule if you happen to miss a day, and what home workouts you can do instead.

Define Boundaries While Testing Limits

Acknowledge that you’re going to make mistakes and need to take breaks. The path to your objective shouldn’t be set in stone – too many factors can arise to throw off your plans and hard work. Instead, take time to acknowledge the possibility of a delay in your plans or the need to adjust your end result. While pushing your limits doesn’t always result in a negative outcome, pushing too far, too hard, too quickly can lead to physical and mental damage that will set you back even further.

Prioritize Your Health

Not only do you need to take your physical health into account, but it’s also important to consider the mental health toll of personal growth. Forming new habits and working towards ambitious goals can cause you to test your limits. It’s crucial to pay attention to your body’s response and use an encouraging inner voice.

With mental health resources like BetterHelp, you can talk with an experienced professional about your personal growth plan and how you can take into account your mental well-being. With their support, you’ll have the tools necessary to notice and change your attitude towards a situation that may increase your anxiety and stress.

Develop a Strong Support Group

Find close friends, family members, and mentors to help you not only stay on track but stay positive as well. Discuss your plans and desired outcome and take into account their feedback and suggestions. If a trusted teacher or friend remarks on the timeline or intensity of your program, consider discussing alternatives or adjustments that would be more realistic for you.

A quality support group will not only be there to support you but will also point out when you’re looking worse for wear. As you work on yourself, it can be difficult to gauge your gradual deterioration in energy, motivation, or comfort. Your support group is there to notice these changes and provide just as much encouragement of a break or change in your plans. While measuring personal growth can be what you need to finally cross the finish line, it doesn’t need to be an anxiety-inducing process.

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Working Through Trauma: How long does it take to recover from abuse?

Recovery is different for each person, situation, and circumstance. Traumatic events leave lasting scars that each individual has ways of coping with. Trust and treatment are especially difficult for those struggling with an abusive past, PTSD, and other traumatic symptoms. 

Finding the right therapist, treatment program, and support system can be a long and difficult journey. However, developing a deeper understanding of mental health and the effects of abuse can encourage people to look for the help they need.

Mental health impacts of abuse and traumatic events

Abuse can happen at any age, from any kind of relationship, and in a number of ways. Trauma isn’t only developed at a young age – it can come after a physically abusive relationship, verbally abusive job, or even a toxic and taxing friendship. While the varying circumstances can affect individuals in dramatically different ways, the end result of trauma is most often the development of a mental health condition.

Anxiety, depression, and PTSD are all common effects of abuse, including reduced trust in individuals, triggering situations, and a negative self-image. Without treatment and support, a person can rapidly decline in their mental state and capabilities. Reaching out to online mental health resources like BetterHelp can help start the journey to recovery as you work through the phases of trauma recovery.

Phases of Trauma Recovery

Safety and Stabilization

The Manitoba Trauma Information & Education Centre lists the first step in recovering from trauma as regaining a sense of security. Those experiencing trauma often feel insecure, unsafe, and uncomfortable in their own bodies and environment.

This process can take anywhere from weeks to years, depending on the support and safety they’re provided. It’s important to start by identifying the areas of their life that need to be stabilized and how to help build trust and comfort within their space.

Remembrance and Mourning

In order to heal and process trauma, one needs to acknowledge and talk through it. It’s crucial to work through this step with a support system, primarily with a trusted counselor or therapist. After you’ve been able to feel safe and vulnerable, it’s time to start pacing yourself through the explanation and story of the event.

Taking the time to go slow and steady is important to avoid activating a fight, flight, or freeze response that can trigger a shutdown. It gives you the opportunity to recognize what was lost and mourn the past.

Reconnection and Integration

It’s not enough to talk through the trauma and put the story behind you. Instead, it’s necessary to rediscover your sense of sense and actively seek a future purpose. This is in an effort to reduce the hold of your trauma, taking away its power over your life.

After acknowledging the impact of your experience, you need to reconnect and integrate into a new life that isn’t dictated or defined by trauma. This process looks different for everyone but having a mental health professional help you work through goals and continuously support you through challenging times can give you the motivation you need to continue forward.

Building a Support System

Having a strong support system is crucial during the time of recovery. As mentioned in the first phase, you may be feeling uncomfortable and unsafe in your environment. While this may not be directly the fault of those around you, it can be an effort to trust others depending on their involvement, proximity to the abuser or situation, or their opinions on mental health.

While having close family members and friends in your support system is helpful for having someone who knows you intimately, it’s not always realistic for certain trauma patients. Instead, consider finding a support group, online or in-person, and connecting with others working through recovery. They should be positive, encouraging, and willing to give you the space needed to work through your own recovery time.

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