Hong Kong’s top shopping for men’s clothing and men’s fashion

December 5, 2016 - City / Fashion

In Hong Kong you’ll find plenty of high end shopping. Popular tourist malls Like IFC, Landmark, Pacific Place and Harbour City in Kowloon offer up some of the most well-known international designers in the world.

Ok, I’ll name some of those designers. We’re talking the likes of Gucci, Burberry, Chanel, Louis Vuitton and Versace. What I won’t do is spend anymore time talking about these mainstream stores/malls because there’s a load of information on the internet already to be had.

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In Hong Kong (and most cities, big and small), women never have problems with shopping options. However, if you’re man that enjoys shopping on their holiday, but doesn’t find Hermes appetizing, it’s not nearly as easy even in a international shopping destination like Hong Kong.

Particularly, moderately-priced street styles and fashion trends local to Hong Kong, if you’re into that, there’s never nearly enough when it comes to men’s clothing. If you’re like me, someone that enjoys shopping and fashion, but prefer a more moderate to low price point then I’m hoping this post can provide some relief for you.

My experience is that I’ve been to Hong Kong multiple times now and I’ve found several areas — mostly in Kowloon — where men’s fashions, both street style and contemporary, can be found in the range of $20-400 HKD (approx $3-$50 USD). I do pretty well searching for decent prices too.

Where to find men’s fashions on the cheap in Hong Kong

If you’re visiting, you’ll probably hit the Ladies Market at some point, same with Temple Street Night Market . At these two popular night markets, you won’t be immediately inundated with fashionable men’s clothes, but if you’re patient, you’ll come across a handful of vendors selling designer clothing, funky t-shirts and sweatshirts, sports jerseys and even local designs.

Stay patient and the night markets will pay off for you

It’s difficult to say what men’s fashions these markets will have at any given point seeing as demand and vendors change often. In my last couple trips, I was able to buy some great knockoffs; designer shirts from $70-$200 HKD ($10-25 USD). In fact, I walked away with more than ten shirts and a couple bags.

In Mongkok is Langham Place. Yes this is a huge mall with *some* high end designers, but on the upper floors are a handful of boutiques that have men’s clothing.

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While you’re in Mong kok, head over to Fa Yuen St. which is a mini street market that spans 2-3 blocks. Both the stalls and the stores surrounding the stalls have some options for men’s clothing. You’ll have to sort through the numerous women’s options, but you can find some gems from stores such as You Mu, Native and a couple others.

After walking up/down Fa Yuen, you’ll reach Sneaker Street which is on that same street, just between Argyle St. and Dundas St. Here you’ll find both sides of the street packed with vendors selling fashionable sneakers and the latest kicks.

About a 15 minute walk from Sneaker Street is Trendy Zone, a compact multi-level mall filled with street and skater styled clothing stores. Lots of Supreme, Nike and BAPE going on. Small tip: most of the stores don’t open until 3-4PM.

Men's street style at Trendy Zone

Like Trendy Zone, the Rise Shopping Arcade located near Granville Road in Tsim Sha Tsui is another multi-level mall giving love to local and street fashions that also doesn’t open until the mid-afternoon (1-2PM). There’s a lot of men’s stores to peruse, but not nearly as many as women’s stores. Still it’s one of the more densely populated shopping destinations for guys looking for reasonably priced trends.

If you shop in Hong Kong, you’ll run across an I.T. store no doubt. The have some great fashion forward brands for men, but typically a little more expensive than I’m willing to pay. The good news is there are I.T. outlets located throughout the city (Tsim Sha Tsui, Causeway Bay, Aberdeen and at the CityGate Outlets). At I.T. outlets, you can get 30-80% off regular prices. After applying the outlet discount, you can walk away with items as low as $200-300 HKD per piece. Usually, pieces after discount are in $600-800HKD range which isn’t bad considering the retail pricing. It’s definitely worth putting in some work.

Walking up and down Nathan Rd. from TST through up through Yau Ma Tai and into Monkok (or vice versa), you’re bound to run across several shops packed to the gills with men’s clothing. The majority of the clothing you’ll find in this small outlets aren’t worth the cheap fabric they’re made with, but every so often if you’re willing to put in the work, you’ll hit the jackpot.

The great thing about these small places is that when you do find something, you’ll walk out of the store with it for approximately $50HKD.  The same goes with all the random potows around Wan Chai, Jordan and Mong Kok areas.

A couple recent fashion finds unearthed from these small shops were a Hood By Air knockoff t-shirt for $40HKD, a couple Dare To Dream long sleeves for $70HKD each, and an all-over printed baseball cap for $20HKD. Again, if you can put up with how stores like Marshalls or Ross are organized, then you can be succesful finding some bargains.

Fashion World over in Whampoa isn’t the fantasy land of fashion one would hope, but this is still worth visiting for that middle ground for men’s trendy clothing. On one of the lower levels, you’ll find a handful of local stores such as ISO:place, Ice Fire, Bauhaus as well as Pull and Bear, Uniqlo and H&M that may tickle your fancy (more on those brands later).

G.O.D. is a local brand for mens shopping in Hong Kong

All over the Hong Kong Island side are multiple outposts of Goods Of Desire (G.O.D.). The store isn’t just clothing, but also features home goods and decor — umbrellas, teapots, soap dishes, pillows, canvas totes —  all in a playful Hong Kong style and Chinese motifs.

Opened in 1996, G.O.D. is a “well-established, multi-faceted local brand” Their fashions are modern takes on Hong Kong and Chinese style. You can find G.O.D. locations in Central, Causeway Bay, Admiralty and Hong Kong International Airport too.

Hong Kong has many international fast fashion brands too

Being from a shopping city, I take for granted the options I have readily available to me. Not only when I’m home in New York City or when I’m visiting another shopping destinations like Hong Kong. Stores like Top Man and Zara aren’t anything special if you live in New York and traveling abroad, but I’d certainy be excited if I was from n city or region without them.

Most everyone has access to an H&M nowadays but there use to be a time when the mega fast fashion retailer was only in the larger metropolises and was an great place to pick up unique items. Not so much any more. The cache of H&M has been replaced by many other up and coming fast fashion shops.

bossini-hong-kong-mens-shopping

As mentioned the rapidly-expanding Zara, the new Cos, the quickly growing Top Man as well as Japanese brand Uniqlo and Muji and Australian-based Cotton On. All have one or more locations in Hong Kong..

If you dont live in a big fashion city you may not be familar with some of these names, but they’re out there. As well as some other brands that can’t be found in the United States such as Bershka and Pull and Bear in Causeway Bay. There are dozens of Giordanos on the Kowloon and Hong Kong side – same goes with G2000Bossini and BSX.

Hong Kong is a great shopping destination, no doubt. How great it is depends on whether you’re a male or female, where you live, your budget, your style and how much work you’re willing to put into it. Have fun.

 

 

› tags: Banana Republic / Fa Yuen St. / Fashion World / Hong Kong / hong kong men's clothing / hong kong shopping / hood by air / izzue / kenzo / kowloon / men's shopping / mongkok / nathan rd. / Temple Street / Top Man / Trendy Zone / Tsim Sha Tsui / Whampoa / zara /

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